TA-SD03 Alaska Self Drive Tour Package | Southeast Alaska Tours

Explore Alaska's Inside Passage by Ferry: Glacier Bay, Sitka, Skagway

Iditarod Iditarod Iditarod
Individual Alaska Adventure Tour by ferry from Skagway or Whitehorse. Travel Southeast Alaska's Inside Passage from Skagway to Juneau. Discover the 3rd largest Alaska City and continue your journey to magnificent Glacier Bay National Park for unsurpassed marine wildlife and glacier viewing. Visit Sitka with it's large Haida and Tlingit totem pole collection and get a glimpse of Sitkas rich Russian heritage before you return to Skagway - gateway to the 1898's Alaska and Yukon goldrush.

Day 1: Whitehorse or Skagway

A place exists in Alaska where the past lives on, where the cries of “gold in the Yukon” still echo from steep canyon walls, where the sounds of barroom pianos and boomtown crowds ring out in the night. A place where the romance and excitement of yesteryear linger around every street corner, every bend in the trail. Skagway... The wide Pacific lying at it’s door, the historic little community, known as the “Gateway to the Klondike,” occupies a lovely site with snow-capped and glaciated peaks as a backdrop. A port of call on south east Alaska’s Inside Passage route , this waterfront town, with it’s pervasive frontier flavour, attracts thousands of visitors annually via road, rail and seaway. Designated a historic district by the US National Park Service, the area along Broadway from First to Seventh Avenues contains forty to fifty turn-of-the-century wooden structures, housing hotels, saloons and shops restored to evoke the days of the Gold Rush. The former railroad depot, a handsome 1898 building, serves as the Park Service visitor centre and departure point for walking tours conducted by park rangers.

Day 2: Skagway - Juneau

Juneau, Alaska's capital city is the third largest city in the state. Like Alaska, Juneau is full of contrasts, a sophisticated cosmopolitan city in the heart of the Tongass National Forest. Nestled at the base of towering mountains overlooking the Gastineau Channel, the community's rich culture and history is displayed throughout the town. Juneau has a vibrant urban feel with great dining, shopping and lodging, while being surrounded by jaw-dropping scenic vistas. Speaking of dining, sampling a city’s local fare is a big part of any vacation and a visit to Juneau delivers tastes that delight the senses. From Alaska salmon, halibut and crab to sourdough bagels, homemade fudge, and award-winning coffee and beer, Juneau can satisfy even the most discriminating palate. Travelers can expect a host of activities from wild to mild. Choose hiking miles of scenic trails through temperate rainforest, tidal beaches and up mountains capped by alpine meadows, or take to the air for stunning views of the coastal mountains and the Juneau Icefield. Helicopters and floatplanes give visitors an exhilarating view and make it possible get a sense of the vast wilderness surrounding Juneau. Backcountry camping, bird watching, bear viewing and berry picking can all happen in the same trip! A stay in Juneau is not complete without some time spent on the water watching graceful humpback whales or hearing your fishing line race out as a King Salmon makes a run for it with your bait. Kayaking gives “up close and personal” a new meaning when quietly paddling past a sea lion haul-out. And day boat tours offer trips to near by Tracy Arm Fjord  - said to rival Glacier Bay with its intimate, yet dramatic glacial landscape.

Day 3: Glacier Bay National Park

Each morning through the summer, a tour boat leaves Bartlett Cove and travels 130 miles through Glacier Bay. For seven hours it will take passengers on a journey through a landscape rich with wildlife, full of human stories and still maturing from recent rebirth. Visitors explore a waterway that was under a river of ice only 250 years ago. A National Park Ranger will be onboard to help spot wildlife, provide commentary and programs to help passengers understand and appreciate Glacier Bay National Park. Be sure to have binoculars ready and rain gear handy so you can be outside to greet each new discovery! Sea Lions at South Marble Island. One of the first highlights of the day is a stop at South Marble Island. The vessel cruises very close to the small isolated island to observe seabirds and marine mammals. Be sure you are outside to see, hear and even smell the creatures that live here. Tufted and Horned Puffins and their cousins the Common Murre nest here alongside Pelagic Cormorants and Black-legged Kittiwakes. Steller Sea Lions haul out here between feeding because of the convenient location, flat, smooth rocks, and nearby feeding grounds. There may be over 300 sea lions clustered on the rocks together, growling and roaring as they wrestle for the best resting spot. Mountain Goats are found on steep mountian sides. As you continue toward the glaciers, you can scan the beach for black bear, grizzly bear, moose, and wolves. Watch along any barren mountainsides for the white coats of the mountain goats that scale precarious cliff edges. Most of this terrestrial wildlife returned recently to this landscape, recolonizing after the retreat of the glaciers that began only two-and-a-half centuries before. Mountain goats, however, may have lived on the lonely peaks that jutted above the rivers ice that flowed in Glacier Bay.

Day 4: Glacier Bay National Park

For those seeking the precious quiet and solitude Glacier Bay can provide, the tour boat offers a drop-off service in the backcountry. The vessel will pull up to shore to drop off kayakers and campers. These adventurers must prepare carefully to have all the food, gear and equipment they need to be in the wilderness, but the rewards are great. They may float on the water hearing the crunch of bear’s teeth on barnacles in the intertidal zone or fall asleep in their tents to the sound of whales breathing. Though you may still be more than twenty miles away, you will soon see the first icebergs from the tidewater glaciers ahead. If you look out onto shore, you should see that the vegetation is very different from what you saw earlier at Bartlett Cove. The closer you are to the glaciers, the more recently the shorelines have emerged from under glacier ice. Your park map will tell you where the face of the glacier was at various dates over the past 250 years. Ask the Ranger where you are and see when the glacier ended there. Soon after lunch, you will be in view of tidewater glaciers. Be sure to have on all those warm layers you brought and get outside, if you aren’t already. You are in the presence of a river of ice many miles long, hundreds of feet thick and around a mile wide. Try to imagine how much snow must have fallen in the Fairweather Mountain range to build these glaciers! In all, you will visit up to four tidewater glaciers. At one, you will sit for at least half an hour, so you will have the chance to see and hear the ice fall (calve) into the water. It is a dramatic sight and an amazing sound. Don’t miss it. Be prepared. Bring warm clothes and rain gear.  Bring binoculars and cameras. And, don’t forget to bring your sense of wonder.  By the end of your day you will have sailed by nearly eight hundred miles of coastline in one of the wildest places left on our planet.  Be prepared to be captivated by the beauty and abundance of Glacier Bay.

Day 5: Glacier Bay National Park - Sitka

Take the ferry for a scenic cruise to Sitka and visit the National Historic Park, where magnificent Tlingit and Haida totem poles line a forest path. Savor one of the worlds finest collections of Native artifacts at the Sheldon Jackson Museum or visit the Alaska Raptor Rehabilitation Center. Discover the rich legacy of Sitka's glorious Russian past at St. Michael's Cathedral. Take a walk around majestic Sitka sound at sunset. With views of island-studded waters and stately spruce forests reaching to the water’s edge, Sitka is considered Alaska’s most beautiful seaside town. Yet Sitka’s hallmark is its tenure and devotion to a culturally diverse past. Ancestral home of the Tlingit Indians, captured by the Russians, sold to the Americans – Sitka carries the legacy of each. While this fascinating heritage is well documented in local museums, the cities ancestry isn’t found only in shelved archives and artifacts. Rather it is all around. Sitka is home to 24 attractions listed on the National Register of Historic Places, seven of which are National Historical Landmarks. Visitors won’t find a lack of explanation for the incredible sites, whether embarking on one of several walking or vehicle tours, or chatting with a long-time resident. Sitkans are rightfully proud and simply eager to share the folklore. Sitka has over 200 rooms, including hotels, charming bed and breakfasts and lodges, as well as several campgrounds and RV facilities. A variety of dining styles and meals are available for your eating pleasure, including authentic Alaskan fare and Northwest cuisine. Sitka’s enticing shops and galleries carry unique items to fit a variety of budgets: traditional Tlingit designs in silver, totem poles, carvings, and woven baskets; Russian lacquer boxes, nesting dolls, icons, and paintings; and contemporary Alaskan artwork, sculpture, wearable art, and gold nuggets. The quality and diversity of items found in Sitka is unsurpassed in any other community throughout the Inside Passage.

Day 6: Sitka - Haines

On the shores of the longest fjord in America, Haines is located in the most picturesque setting the human eye has seen and everything you dreamed Alaska would be. Surrounded by glacier-covered mountains rising from the sea and numerous lakes and streams abundant with fish and wildlife, you’ll feel like you have come home to paradise Uniquely rich in Tlingit culture and Alaskan history, Haines offers a wide range of things to see and do including nature and adventure tours, artist galleries, quaint retail shops, and out of the ordinary museums including the world’s only Hammer Museum. See artists’ exceptional work from jewelry to totems poles in local galleries and shops and take yourself on a walking tour of historical Fort Seward. A full calendar of events highlights the lifestyle and flavor of our small community. Outdoor enthusiasts of all levels will find unlimited opportunities for recreation and adventure in every season. Fill your days with activities such as hiking, biking, kayaking, snowmobiling, skiing, bird-watching, and wildlife viewing just to name a few. Charter boats and local outfitters offer sport-fishing for salmon and halibut. Numerous tours are available allowing our guests to soak up their surroundings with experiences from extreme adventure to simple pleasures at a leisurely pace.

Day 7: Skagway or Whitehorse

The year was 1898 and Gold Fever was in the air. Stampeders from across North America were flocking to the Klondike Gold Fields in great numbers. The trek to the Klondike, which began in Skagway, Alaska, and over the Chilkoot Pass, was punctuated by numerous hazards, none more feared than the infamous Miles Canyon Rapids. As fortune seekers gathered at the head of the rapids, an assortment of temporary structures was built, and the first town site of our city was created. These early settlers noted that the rapids looked like the manes of charging white horses. The town became known as “White Horse” until 1957 when the Geographic Board of Canada adopted its current spelling of “Whitehorse”. Today Whitehorse is a modern, thriving city of over 22,000 people, which has not forgotten its gold rush past. Whitehorse is a spectacular 2-hour drive from Skagway. Visitors can expect a full service community with pristine wilderness in its backyard. Located along the Yukon River and surrounded by rolling hills, there is plenty of outdoor activity for guests of all ages. For the less adventurous, Whitehorse offers a multitude of trendy cafés, impressive art galleries and interesting museums.  During the dry summer months, the summer comes to life with art and music. Whitehorse is proud of its deep First Nation roots, and a trip to the city would not be complete without exploring its First Nation ancestry.

Tour Includes

  • 6 Nights Superior OR First-Class Accommodation
  • Hotel and State Taxes
  • Catamaran Cruise from Skagway - Juneau
  • Flight Juneau - Skagway
  • Flight Gustavus - Sitka
  • Ferry Sitka - Juneau
  • Full Day Glacier Bay Sightseeing Cruise
  • Skagway City Tour
  • Sitka City Tour
  • Transfer from/to Gustavus to Glacier Bay
  • National Park Fee
  • Tour Documentation

Rates per Person in US $ from Skagway or Whitehorse

Tour Number | TA-SD09 | Daily Departures
Single Double Triple Quad

May 01 - May 31 | Superior Hotels

June 01 - August 31 | Superior Hotels

September 01 - September 20 | Superior Hotels

 

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

 

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00


$0.00

$0.00

$0.00


$0.00

$0.00

$0.00


Tour Number | TA-SD09 | Daily Departures
Single Double Triple Quad

May 01 - May 31 | First Class Hotels

June 01 - August 31 | First Class Hotels

September 01 - September 20 | First Class Hotels

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00


Optional Sightseeing Tours

Rates in US$ / Per Person
Adult

Skagway: White Pass Yukon Railroad | Bus Tour to Whitehorse

Skagway: White Pass Yukon Railroad Tour

Glacier Bay: Whale Watching Cruise

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00


Tour Package | Rental Car Upgrades

Rental Car Category | Taxes + Unlimited Free Mileage Included
Upgrade Extra Day

Compact Car | Chevrolet Aveo or similar

Mid Size Car | Toyota Corolla or similar

Full Size Car | Chevrolet Malibu or similar

Mid Size SUV | Ford Escape or similar

Full Size SUV | Jeep Grand Cherokee or similar

Mini Van | Dodge Grand Caravan or similar

 

 

 

 

 

Included

$70.00

$110.00

$160.00

$240.00

$240.00

$85.00

$95.00

$105.00

$110.00

$130.00

$130.00